Does overpronation or over supination cause running injuries? The NY Times explores, Dr. Charschan offers some sound advice not offered in the article.

Does overpronation or over supination cause running injuries? The NY Times explores, Dr. Charschan offers some sound advice not offered in the article.

The industry of selling running shoes has defined how we look for shoes, the type of shoe we believe we should be in and the affect the shoe has on our style of walking. Many runners are accustomed to the terms supination and pronation, and many have been taught to believe that if we limit the amount of over supination or overpronation, it will lead to fewer injuries. The NY Times recently reported on a new study published online this month in The British Journal of Sports Medicine, that looked at these types of gait styles in unseasoned runners who were less schooled in running styles and were relatively new to running. The study seems to show that even with corrective shoes (more controlling), the percentage of injury seemed to be no different in those who wore shoes with more correction vs. those with less correction. You can read the article here:

A Popular Myth About Running Injuries

By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
Almost everyone who runs (or has shopped for running shoes) has heard that how your foot pronates, or rolls inward, as you land affects your injury risk. Pronate too much or too little, conventional wisdom tells us, and you’ll wind up hurt. But a provocative new study shows that this deeply entrenched belief is probably wrong and that there is still a great deal we don’t understand about pronation and why the foot rolls as it does.

For the new study, published online this month in The British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark and other institutions began by advertising in Danish newspapers and at gyms to find men and women who didn’t run but were game to try.

Recruiting novice runners for studies of injury risk is somewhat unusual. More typically, researchers rely on surveys of experienced runners, since those are, after all, the people who develop running injuries. By asking them about themselves, their training, their bodies and how they became injured, researchers have gained valuable insights into why runners get hurt.

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After reading this article, you may be wondering what does cause injuries in most runners? The answer lies in the macro (how the body moves, symmetry, etc.) vs. the micro (what is happening at the feet). What is different about those who have running injuries vs. those who do not? To understand running from a macro perspective, read this blog post here .

The problem is much greater than what happens in the feet. The problem has to do with symmetry, what happens at the feet, the accommodation in the myofascia surrounding your core muscles and how you accommodate in your upper body which equals bad running habits. The book Cheating Mother Nature, what you need to know to beat chronic pain can be a helpful guide for those who have had running injuries because it describes what happens to the kinetic chains (series of joints in the leg and arms) due to overpronation and supination. Once you read this, you will understand why your body style, and the way you accommodate to it, is why injuries occur in most runners. Looking at the feet is just part of the problem.

Some things you can do to improve running symmetry and reduce ground forces include:

1. Foam rolling to the core muscles, IT band, gluts, quadratus lumborum and calve muscles which will improve firing patterns and decrease inappropriate muscular recruitment into the core muscles.

2. Foot orthotics are a better way of creating symmetry than a stiffer shoe (more control) and more comfortable shoe.

3. Find a good certified or better sports chiropractor who understands runners and running dynamics. You can learn quite a bit by putting someone on a treadmill and taking a video with your cell phone. Visually seeing over and under striding on a video can be helpful to any runner who is having injuries.

4. Core stability exercises will help you improve your running power and mechanical form.

Find out more by reading Cheating Mother Nature, what you need to know to beat chronic pain available through Amazon.com