New hope for sufferers of Rheumatoid Arthritis may involve your gut says the Huffington Post

bacteria

New hope for sufferers of Rheumatoid Arthritis may involve your gut says the Huffington Post

Is rheumatoid arthritis inherited, or perhaps a symptom of the way our body is behaving in a changed environment says a new study. According to the Huffington Post, a study by New York University Langone Medical Center found that 75% of those who have Rhumatoid Arthritis have an overabundance of Prevotella copri, a bacteria in the gut.

Perhaps there is new hope now for sufferers of the condition, known for painful and often disfigured fingers. Of course, this finding may lead to cures from antibiotics or perhaps, supplementation with probiotics to help the gut function more appropriately. Read more here

Gut Bacteria Linked With Rheumatoid Arthritis In New Study

The bacteria in your gut could play a role in rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests.

Researchers from the New York University Langone Medical Center found that people with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis have a greater abundance of the intestinal bacteria Prevotella copri than people without the inflammatory disease, or those who have had the disease for a while but were managing it with treatment.

“Our own results in mouse studies encouraged us to take a closer look at patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and we found this remarkable and surprising association,” study researcher Dan R. Littman, M.D., Ph.D., a microbiology and pathology professor at NYU, said in a statement. However, he cautioned that the study does not prove a causal link between the bacteria and rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that affects the lining of the joints — usually in the hands and feet — causing swelling, deformity of the joints and even erosion of the bone, the Mayo Clinic reported. Anywhere from 0.5 to 1 percent of the general population is estimated to have the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The exact cause of the disease is unknown, but genetics seem to play a part in susceptibility to other factors (such as infections) that could lead to rheumatoid arthritis, the Mayo Clinic noted.

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For a more medically orientated explanation geared toward doctors, click on this link

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Rheumatology/Arthritis/42799?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2013-11-09&utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&eun=g553573d0r&userid=553573&email=backfixer@aol.com&mu_id=5680882