A new study suggests organic crops are healthier for you overall with fewer pesticides than commercially farmed crops

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A new study suggests organic crops are healthier for you overall with fewer pesticides than commercially farmed crops

More of us are looking to eat healthy, with better food. Organic crops is a growing category in most supermarkets and has given rise to chains such as whole foods. Is this a marketing gimmick or do organically grown fruits and vegetables actually feed us better.

A recent review that was featured in the NY Times reveals that organic vegetables are richer in anti oxidants than many of the foods that are farmed by commercial American farms. In Europe, many foods are grown organically. While organic foods do have somewhat lower yields, is it the quantity of food or the quality of the food that is more important? Apparently, more people are voting with their wallets as they shop for organic foods. The good news is that organic foods are now becoming more plentiful as the prices of these foods is gradually beginning to drop.

Check out the NY Times article here

Study of Organic Crops Finds Fewer Pesticides and More Antioxidants

Adding fuel to the debates over the merits of organic food, a comprehensive review of earlier studies found substantially higher levels of antioxidants and lower levels of pesticides in organic fruits, vegetables and grains compared with conventionally grown produce.

“It shows very clearly how you grow your food has an impact,” said Carlo Leifert, a professor of ecological agriculture at Newcastle University in England, who led the research. “If you buy organic fruits and vegetables, you can be sure you have, on average, a higher amount of antioxidants at the same calorie level.”

However, the full findings, to be published next week in the British Journal of Nutrition, stop short of claiming that eating organic produce will lead to better health.

“We are not making health claims based on this study, because we can’t,” Dr. Leifert said. The study, he said, is insufficient “to say organic food is definitely healthier for you, and it doesn’t tell you anything about how much of a health impact switching to organic food could have.”

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