Becoming ill from Covid19 may be determined by the dosage you get from someone else according to the NY Times.

Becoming ill from Covid19 may be determined by the dosage you get from someone else according to the NY Times.

This past week the Governor of NJ said that the transmission of Covid19 had become much slower than before, with a less than 1 to 1 transmission between people which was previously reported at 5 to 1.  What that means is that fewer people are infecting others.

Who is infected vs. who actually feels ill may be determined by the amount of the virus which we now know is transmitted in the air.   Wearing masks and keeping our distance may have been more effective than anything else so far in reducing transmission.

As Nj begins to reopen, our improved understanding of the virus will likely determine the recommendations of what people can and cannot do to stay healthy.   Also, in a recent NY Times article, they suggested that lower dosages of the virus may be handled just fine by your immune system.   Unfortunately, you can become infected by someone who has the virus but may be two to three days from actually showing any symptoms.

Check out the article below.   For more information on the latest on Covid19, check out our blog.

It’s Not Whether You Were Exposed to the Virus. It’s How Much.

The pathogen is proving a familiar adage: The dose makes the poison.

By Apoorva Mandavilli May 29, 2020

When experts recommend wearing masks, staying at least six feet away from others, washing your hands frequently, and avoiding crowded spaces, what they’re really saying is: Try to minimize the amount of virus you encounter.

A few viral particles cannot make you sick — the immune system would vanquish the intruders before they could. But how much virus is needed for an infection to take root? What is the minimum effective dose?

A precise answer is impossible because it’s difficult to capture the moment of infection. Scientists are studying ferrets, hamsters, and mice for clues but, of course, it wouldn’t be ethical for scientists to expose people to different doses of the coronavirus, as they do with milder cold viruses.

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