Is CBD for real, or is this a new snake oil fad.

Is CBD for real, or is this a new snake oil fad.

Cannabidiol, or CBD is the part of the marijuana plant that will not get you intoxicated, but if you believe the hype, it will relieve pain, and help your depression, insomnia and relieve anxiety.

It is likely that marijuana will become legal for recreational use in many if not all states.  It has already been legalized in Canada and Colorado and current legislation in NJ is being finalized.

As with any mania, often, the buzz behind the product is often stronger than the effectiveness of the product. A few years ago, Turmeric had this type of buzz which has now cooled down quite a bit.  Turmeric is a very powerful anti inflammatory if used appropriately and at the proper dosage.

The science behind CBD right now is quite weak, as most of the studies were on animals.

CBD is available as a cream, as well as in a tincture you can apply under the tongue.

CBD is known to be safe for consumption and it is legal to sell because it does not have THC, the component of marijuana that produces the high.

GW pharmaceuticals is one company that has a proven record for products made from Marijuana, and has drugs being developed that have been approved by the FDA. Epidiolex is the first CBD medicine that has become FDA approved.

Other products that are found on health food store shelves may not be effective or may not be pharmaceutical grade meaning that they are held to strict standards for dosing.

Check out the NY Times article below
CBD Is Everywhere, but Scientists Still Don’t Know Much About It
“It is a kind of a new snake oil in the sense that there are a lot of claims and not so much evidence,” said one expert.

By Roni Caryn Rabin
Feb. 25, 2019

Cannabidiol, or CBD, a nonintoxicating component of the marijuana plant, is touted as a magic bullet that eases pain, anxiety, insomnia and depression. Salves, sprays, tinctures and oils containing CBD are marketed as aphrodisiacs that boost desire; as balms for eczema, pimples and hot flashes; and even as treatments for serious diseases like diabetes and multiple sclerosis.

Unlike THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, the “psychoactive” component of the cannabis plant, CBD won’t get you “high.” But scientists know little about what it can do: Most of the information about CBD’s effects in humans is anecdotal or extrapolated from animal studies, and few rigorous trials have been conducted.

“It is a kind of a new snake oil in the sense that there are a lot of claims and not so much evidence,” said Dustin Lee, an assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University who is planning a human trial of CBD for use in quitting smoking.

Read more